The Drug Report

Facts about what can go wrong when people use drugs

  • The Best Drug Info Ever?

    A big part of my inspiration for The Drug Report was Beth Pearce's amazing film, VOICE OF THE VICTIMS: TRUE STORIES OF ECSTASY AND KETAMINE. The film simply lets the victims of drug tragedies tell their stories. It's real life, it's undeniable, and it's incredibly powerful. I'm sure Beth has saved many, many lives, and it is my hope that this blog will do so as well. To learn more about her film, go to Voice Of The Victims.

    FACTS ARE FACTS

    A friend of mine likes to say, "You're entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts."

    When it comes to drugs, there are lots of opinions out there: Some think drugs are safe and fun, some think they're dangerous and frightening, and many think everything in between.

    But facts are facts, and when someone dies from drugs, or someone is murdered by a person who is on drugs, or is raped by someone who has given them drugs, that's just a fact. Drug users who actively promote drug use rail against these facts, and I expect they'll be commenting regularly on The Drug Report. But they can't change the facts.

Family Man, Addict, Prisoner

Posted by Childress on July 15, 2006

Here’s a story about a guy who had every opportunity to do right.  Instead, he took every opportunity to do crack. What a disaster!  From the Hartford (CT) Courant:

Robert Dyer is 50, white, a doting husband and father and lifelong Canton resident with an impressive work record.

He also was feeding high-powered weapons into the arsenal on Hartford’s streets to sate his escalating hunger for drugs.

At Dyer’s sentencing before Senior U.S. District Judge Ellen Bree Burns Thursday, a federal prosecutor expressed incredulity at the outpouring of support for Dyer by friends, neighbors and colleagues. Assistant U.S. Attorney Brian Leaming mused what the scenario would be if the same crime bore a different face.

“I wonder if it was a Hartford man – a father, son, brother, neighbor – who had a drug addiction and decided he would put guns into the hands of a known drug dealer and convicted felon in the town of Canton, knowing that that gun would be used in a crime of violence or wind up in the hands of a child, would they be here,” Leaming queried during the proceeding. “I suspect they would say, `37 to 46 months, is that all he gets?'” …

“The public needs to be aware of the fact the courts take these crimes very seriously,” Burns said before sentencing Dyer to 37 months. He is scheduled to surrender to U.S. marshals Aug. 3.

Dyer’s wife, Carol, wept quietly during the nearly hour-long sentencing proceeding, though Dyer himself showed no visible reaction when he learned his fate. He spoke briefly during the hearing.

“I did a very bad thing,” he said. “I’m very sorry.

“I just feel so bad for my family,” Dyer added. “If I have to go for a long time, I don’t know what they’ll do. I’ve never done anything like that; I’ll never do it again.” …

Dyer’s lawyer, Alan J. Sobol, argued vigorously for a sentence involving little or no incarceration citing Dyer’s role as his family’s sole source of financial support. Dyer’s wife stays home to care for the couple’s seriously disabled 23-year-old daughter, Jessica. Another daughter, 21-year-old Joan, also lives with them and commutes to college.

“His judgment was clearly clouded by his involvement in drugs,” Sobol said ….

But substance abuse has nagged Dyer since his teen years, Sobol wrote in a sentencing memorandum. At 15 he was drinking a six-pack of beer and smoking marijuana on a daily basis. At 30 he added cocaine to the mix; at 40, heroin. At 45 he became addicted to crack cocaine.

Alcohol begets marijuana begets cocaine begets heroin begets crack begets more ruined lives.

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One Response to “Family Man, Addict, Prisoner”

  1. Ian said

    The man was clearly sick, as are most drug users. They’re sick, and down, and go to drugs for something else, but what does locking them up do? They should be in hospitals, in rehabilitation, not in a cell.

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